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New York Times, January 22, 2015

The speaker of the New York State Assembly, Sheldon Silver, was arrested on federal corruption charges on Thursday and accused of using the power of his office for more than a decade to secure millions of dollars in bribes and kickbacks and then covering up his schemes, according to court documents.

Forbes, January 23, 2015

The criminal complaint against New York’s powerful Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver probably came as a shock to his fellow politicians and constituents in New York. It shouldn’t be surprising to anyone who’s studied the murky world of mass torts and class actions.

SE Texas Record, January 13, 2015

In a recent article in Texas Lawyer, one of the architects behind authoring a tort reform bill passed in 2011 says the use of the “loser pays” component of the law has been a “surprise.”

Forbes, January 22, 2015

Federal prosecutors unsealed a criminal complaint against New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, detailing long-rumored allegations about how a prominent asbestos law firm steered millions of dollars to the powerful politician in exchange for client referrals from a doctor, who in turn is accused of accepting favors from Silver.

 
Madison Record, January 12, 2015

For the first time since the days of Governor Jim Edgar, Illinois now has a chief executive who believes the state needs to reform laws dealing with civil litigation.

The New England Journal of Medicine, January 8, 2015

Waxman et al. (Oct. 16 issue)1 state that malpractice reform has had little effect on the ordering practices of emergency department physicians, and they speculate that physicians may perceive the effects of potential litigation on ordering practices to be far greater than they actually are. An alternative explanation of their findings may be that, once the custom of ordering tests that may be marginally indicated but performed because of malpractice considerations has become ingrained, it is difficult to break the habit of such ordering practices, even when litigation is no longer a consideration. The reflex of ordering computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging may still be active under many circumstances. Certainly, habits can become very difficult to break regardless of the original stimulus.

Legal Newsline, January 21, 2015

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (Legal Newsline) – Four complaints that accuse asbestos law firms of racketeering were recently unsealed, providing a glimpse into information a federal bankruptcy judge likely relied on when he found those firms have committed “a startling pattern of misrepresentation” through the years.

SE Texas Record, January 15, 2015

An issue of a property owner’s liability for independent contractors is presently before the Texas Supreme Court and could determine whether a $2.64 million asbestos verdict against Dow Chemical stands.

The New England Journal of Medicine, January 8, 2015

Waxman et al. (Oct. 16 issue)1 state that malpractice reform has had little effect on the ordering practices of emergency department physicians, and they speculate that physicians may perceive the effects of potential litigation on ordering practices to be far greater than they actually are. An alternative explanation of their findings may be that, once the custom of ordering tests that may be marginally indicated but performed because of malpractice considerations has become ingrained, it is difficult to break the habit of such ordering practices, even when litigation is no longer a consideration. 

SE Texas Record, January 13, 2015

In a recent article in Texas Lawyer, one of the architects behind authoring a tort reform bill passed in 2011 says the use of the “loser pays” component of the law has been a “surprise.”

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